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by Jan W '13

Erik Verlinde: Challenging Gravity since 1962

It makes ourselves and any object around us accelerate downwards at 9.8 meters-per-second squared… but why? Since approximately 1650 when the famous apple fell from the tree, gravity has been perpetually accepted as the most fundamental aspect of the physical world. The daunting truth is that there are no putative explanations for why various physical bodies in the universe are attracted one another.
Let’s take a step back into the profession of Erik Verlinde, a respected professor and theoretical physicist who has recently been interviewed on his venture to take on the question that has baffled

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by Jan W '13

BSGE’s College Readiness

BSGE is among the top public NYC schools rated with what the DOE calls the “college readiness” factor. This means BSGE among other schools is no longer being evaluated solely on grades, but also on how well-prepared students are to pursue higher education. The New York City Department of Education defines the “college-readiness index” of a New York City public high school as the percentage of graduating students in a given school who qualify to avoid remedial college courses. While BSGE boasts a 100 percent graduation rate, according to NYC standards, only 97 percent of its graduates last year were considered “ready” for college. The majority of schools rated by the DOE do not hold a 100 percent readiness percentage. In fact, only 5 of the 28 ranked schools mentioned in a

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by Jan W '13 by Ricardo A '13

A Word on Science: Neutrinos

Until recently, it was a widely accepted notion that the fastest possible speed was the speed of light at 299,792,458 m/s. But new information about neutrinos, subatomic particles, has surfaced revealing that its own speed may be faster than the speed of light. These tiny particles whose mass is close to 0 penetrate all mass in the known universe, including the sun.
Neutrinos were first postulated in 1930 by Wolfgang Pauli, known for his contributions to the field of electron configurations. The first image of a neutrino was taken with the aid of a