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by Daniel S '20 by Maya G '20

What’s Up With the New Grading Policy?

On the first day of school, there are many things on the mind of a student, like seeing their friends after a long time, and meeting their new teachers. One thing no one expected to hear was that last year’s open grading policy everyone was used to was overhauled into a uniform policy. While in the past, teachers were allowed to set their own weightings for grade breakdowns, now every teacher must use a 60%, 30%, 10% policy. Minor assignments like homework and quizzes are now worth 30% of the grade, and class participation is only worth 10%. Tests and major assessments remain a significant portion of the final grade at 60%.

Several teachers and students told us what they about the radical change. “I would say not to worry. I feel like the types of assessments that teachers are giving aren’t going to change that much,” Mr. Anderson said. “All it has done is just publicize what the grading policy is going to be, for everybody in the school, so we could have more uniformity… I think a lot of the grades are pretty much going to be around the same.” Several other teachers seemed to say things along these lines. “I’m not going to put any different emphasis on assignments. It simply means that I will have to keep a little bit closer track of certain assignments, so that I can include them in the grade,” explained Shantanu Saha. Another teacher agreed. “I don’t think it will change it too much. In the past, homework probably accounted for somewhat more in my class then it will now, but I think students that do all the homework and get good grades on homework will get good grades on major assignments.” A third, anonymous teacher also said something along these lines. “This has been my grading policy for a long time. I’m also glad that it’s a universal grading policy as opposed to confusing the heck out of the kids.” Several seventh graders, to whom this had not been a change, said they felt it was fair. “I think it makes it easier for everything to be more uniform and not mixed up,” said one seventh grader. “I don’t think I really care,” claimed another from 7-4, and his friend agreed. “It was the same thing at my old school, so it’s not really a big change.”

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by Maya G '20 Uncategorized

Bathroom Door Mystery

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Most BSGE girls of all grades have probably noticed that the bathroom door on the third floor was replaced with a wooden door last month. Many thought such a sudden replacement was strange and didn’t know the reason, but have assumed that the old door wasn’t stable enough.

“It’s strange, but I have no idea why,” one senior said with a shrug of her shoulders. “I guess it was the janitors. Maybe the old door was falling off its hinges and they thought it was a safety hazard. I don’t know, but I don’t think Ms. Johnson does either.”

The students interviewed all agreed that they don’t know why the door was replaced with a wooden one, but it is definitely strange. “I actually haven’t noticed it, no.” states one anonymous girl. “I’ve been in too much of a rush. That sounds kind of weird, though, and I don’t know why they did it.” When asked, another student, Rachel Z ’20, said “Nope. I don’t know why. Does anyone?”